The Talks: Interview with Tom Ford

The Talks highlights fashion designer Tom Ford as its latest interview subject. Below is an excerpt from the intriguing piece which steers clear of the cliche fashion-related questions and delves into more of a personal side of the Southwest native. Topics of interest include Tom’s current state of mind, his spirituality, personal relationships and inspiration, although the interview definitely centers on the designer’s simplistic nature and appreciation for life as a whole, which is quite refreshing to read.

Mr. Ford, have you had a midlife crisis?
Yes. Leaving Gucci was devastating for me. Devastating because I had really put everything into that for fifteen years and all of a sudden I had no identity. “Who am I? What am I doing? I have no forum to speak to anyone anymore or to convey my thoughts or ideas.” Maybe I drank a little too much – living in London that’s a very easy thing to do. The emphasis in my life maybe switched to things that were not the important things. So yeah, I had a bit of a midlife crisis. I wish there was a better term for that. It comes to everybody, maybe in your thirties, maybe in your forties, maybe in your sixties or seventies, who knows. You get to the moment where you feel the clock is ticking and you are wondering if you are really getting the most out of your life.

If you have everything in life it is easier to lose yourself, it seems.
And if you do have everything it is also easier to understand that those are not the important things. Unfortunately a lot of people don’t get to that point. They spend their lives striving and still don’t learn those lessons. Other people figure it out at age twenty and they’re completely balanced and together and understand how to keep things in check from an early age.

How would you describe your current state of mind?
I feel that I don’t need anything for a good life. I grew up in New Mexico and the older I get I have less need for contemporary culture and big cities and all the stuff we are bombarded with. I am happier at my ranch in the middle of nowhere watching a bug carry leaves across the grass, listening to silence, riding my horse, and being in open space. So I have some sort of security that if I lost everything in my life, I would be very happy with the simple things because they are the ones that are important.

So the glamour you stand for doesn’t interest you?
After just being in New Mexico for two months, I realized that I could really work from anywhere. I am really a loner after all; I am really not a social person. Because of my job people think I am out every night, but I really hate all that. I am somebody who likes to be alone and see some close friends. I am a shy and introspective person.

Do you get the most inspiration from nature? It is the ultimate beauty, after all.
Yes, nature is the closest thing to God and I don’t mean God by any sort of religion but by the connection to the universe, which I think we have lost. The American Indians had that and where I live is actually the center of the Anasazi Indian civilization. I even have two huge Anasazi ruins on the property of my ranch. I am not saying that there definitely is some sort of spirituality coming from there, but there might be. When you are close to the earth and you get up when the sun comes up and you go to sleep when it goes down, it puts everything in perspective.

Really?
Yes, all the rest of this crap just fades away. We’ve lost our contact with the earth. Dogs don’t have guilt, dogs don’t have insecurity complexes, dogs don’t think that they need a bigger house than the other dog. Dogs are just completely themselves. They’re very in touch, they’re not thinking about their death. They are just rolling on their back, enjoying what that feels like. I think that is sort of the appeal of animals in our lives; that is what’s important.

Are you a spiritual person?
I am a spiritual person in an eastern religion kind of way. I learned that happiness for all of us is a switch that you flick in your brain. It doesn’t have anything to do with getting a new house, a new car, a new girlfriend, or a new pair of shoes. Our culture is very much about that; we are never happy with what we have today. We always think that we need something else to be happy.

This all sounds like you have a tough time living the Hollywood life that everybody expects you to.
I did have a tough time dealing with it and I have learned how to separate it. It is a performance; it is me playing a role. I am not saying that there are no aspects of it that I enjoy; I love beautiful women, beautiful dresses, and beautiful flowers. But all those things have to stay in perspective. There is nothing wrong with loving the fact that we are physical beings but you have got to keep them in perspective. It is just a diversion. It’s one of the nice things in life, like eating a great steak or kissing a good kisser – well, kissing a good kisser is maybe more valuable than all the other stuff – but these are things you have to leave behind when you leave the planet. When I am on my deathbed, I don’t think I will be thinking about a nice pair of shoes I had or my beautiful house. I am going to be thinking about an evening I spent with somebody when I was twenty where I felt that I was just absolutely connected to them.

Are you really that much of a romantic?
Yeah, I’m really a romantic.

How long does it take every morning for you to become that Tom Ford you were talking about before?
It takes me a long time in the morning to become the person that other people expect me to be. When I feel depressed and I have a bad day or something terrible has happened or I have to face something, I go through a very precise ritual getting dressed in the morning. In a sense it is armor; I’m building up a layer. If everything in my material world is in order, I will be able to get through it. That perfectionism comes from me being a Virgo. My inner world is related to my outer world. If my house is a wreck, I’m a wreck. If I am together, that’s together. That’s a kind of balance.

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Beyonce Gets Complex

Beyonce is still in promo mode and she is looking damn good doing it. She’s featured on the Aug/Sept cover of Complex magazine.In the magazine she discusses many things, including Jay-Z, Frank Ocean, and her new album 4.

On the repetition in music & creating 4:
Figuring out a way to get R&B back on the radio is challenging. Everything sounds the same on the radio. With 4 I tried to mix R&B from the ’70s and the ’90s with rock ‘n’ roll and a lot of horns to create something new and exciting. I wanted musical changes, bridges, vibrata, live instrumentation, and classic songwriting.

On why Frank Ocean was a must for her album:
Jay had a CD playing in the car one Sunday when we were driving to Brooklyn. I noticed his tone, his arrangements, and his storytelling. I immediately reached out to him—literally the next morning. I asked him to fly to New York and work on my record.

On knowing what makes a hit:
I’ve found that with hit records the melody and lyrics come together [naturally]. I usually know from the hook if the song is something that transcends language, race, and genre, and if it’s something that affects pop culture. It’s something I can visualize people singing in stadiums all over the world. But my favorite songs on my albums are usually not my singles.

On Jay-Z as a creative genius:
Jay’s music is more than music. His lyrics have fathered generations. All that he has overcome gives millions so much hope. There are moments when I see his lips moving and I can see lyrics floating above his head and I think, ‘Wow! How did I get so lucky to be able to witness this level of genius so closely?

On motivation and complaining:
I only allow myself one day to feel sorry for myself. People who complain really get on my nerves. When I’m not feeling my best I ask myself, ‘What are you gonna do about it?’ I use the negativity to fuel the transformation into a better me.

On her legacy:
I just want my legacy to be great music. Someone who was a risk taker and someone who had songs that struck conversation and emotion.

50 Cent Big Ups Kelly Rowland

Vodpod videos no longer available.

50 cent shares the same feelings that we have for Kelly Rowland, he wants her to win! With all the hype surrounding Motivation, the pressure is on for Ms. Rowland to bring it when her album drops.

Stalley – NBC New York Interview

Vodpod videos no longer available.

NBC New York’s Dale Eisinger recently spoke with Stalley, who will be performing at the Brooklyn Hip Hop Festival this Saturday on the Tobacco Warehouse stage. Stalley delved into the philosophy behind his lyrical content, Hunter S. Thompson, his beard and his excitement in performing at Brooklyn Hip Hop Festival for the first time.

Rich & Black Chronicles: Raekwon & Nas pt. 4

Here is the final clip of Raekwon and Nas backstage in Oslo, Norway. This clip has another exclusive performance in the after-party of the song “Verbal Intercoarse” off Raekwons Only Built 4 Cuban Linx album.

J. Cole 106 Seconds – (Video)

We expecting greatness J. Cole, nothing but greatness. The pressure is on son!!

Nas x Raekwon: Part 1 (Video)

The look on Raekwon’s face is priceless as Nas takes him down memory lane.

In a week’s notice, LRG films traveled to Oslo, Norway to shoot the new video for “Rich and Black” with Raekwon and Nas. While backstage in Oslo, we got some behind the scenes footage of the two hip-hop legacies. In this clip, Nas speaks about his first time meeting Raekwon. This is the first of 2 videos of backstage conversations and performances with Raekwon and Nas, so check back tomorrow. The final video for “Rich and Black” drops Thursday. “Rich and Black” is off Rae’s new album Shaolin vs. Wu-tang. Here is the link to download it on itunes itunes.apple.com/​us/​album/​shaolin-vs-wu-tang/​id418563751.

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